FX Outlook

 

FX Outlook
March 23, 2010 Posted by
It seems to have been a while since we examined what is happening with the Canadian dollar (CAD). The CAD — affectionately known as the loonie after the bird that is on the back of the one dollar bill — is approaching parity with the US$. The question that is inevitably being asked: How strong will it get?
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FX Outlook
March 16, 2010 Posted by
All governments regulate foreign trade. The extent to which they do so is a matter of great controversy and debate. Advocates of protectionism focus on the cost advantages of cheap labor in less developed countries, infant domestic industries needing protection
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FX Outlook
March 08, 2010 Posted by
"Acquaintance A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, but not well enough to lend to." Ambrose Bierce, U.S. author and satirist (1842 – 1914), The Devil's Dictionary We must all be acquaintances of our respective governments, for
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FX Outlook
March 02, 2010 Posted by
Over the past couple of months, sovereign risk has dominated the headlines in the foreign exchange markets. Financially strapped countries like Greece have put the euro on its longest losing streak against the dollar since November 2008. Debt investors have also grown concerned about budget deficits in other euro-region countries such as Spain and Ireland. The USD is has risen nearly 10 percent from its lows against the EUR from just two months ago. From my perspective, the entire episode confirms the dollar's status is still the world's only reserve currency. However, not all currencies are being punished.
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FX Outlook
February 23, 2010 Posted by
As we entered the new year, the perceived global economic recovery continued to sputter along as it did in 2H09. Last year's recovery theme was centered on supporting the global banking system via the central banks' strategy of flooding the market with massive amounts of liquidity and support. With the banking system in much better shape by year-end, the G-10 economies were expected to slowly build on the positive momentum and show real, identifiable progress in 2010.
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FX Outlook
February 16, 2010 Posted by
The Australian dollar (AUD) and the Canadian dollar (CAD) have a lot in common. They are both backed by economies that are reliant on commodity exports. For investors looking to hedge or speculate on commodities via foreign exchange, they both provide ample liquidity as the world's sixth and seventh most traded currencies.
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FX Outlook
February 08, 2010 Posted by

“Have no friends not equal to yourself.” Confucius, The Confucian Analects“To have little is to possess. To have plenty is to be perplexed.” Lao tzu, The Way of Lao tzu What’s interesting about the quotes from these two great sages

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FX Outlook
February 02, 2010 Posted by

Given last week's break of 1.4000 by the euro as the focus on the Greek debt situation continues, I thought it would be good to take a deeper dive into where the different countries that make up the euro stand.First,

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FX Outlook
January 26, 2010 Posted by

As they tend to do with remarkable frequency, politicians and regulators have become involved in various markets around the world over the past week, and the results have not been pretty for the most part. 

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FX Outlook
January 19, 2010 Posted by

On January 7 of this year, the day after his appointment as Japan's finance minister, Naoto Kan stated that there was a need for the yen to weaken in order to help Japanese exporters. The markets did not treat this statement lightly, for it effectively reverses the long-held position of his predecessor, Hirohisa Fujii, of allowing the value of the yen to be determined solely by market forces. Fujii-san had resigned earlier in the week due to ill health. Kan explained that he "must work with the Bank of Japan to bring the yen to appropriate levels given its impact on the economy" and that "many Japanese firms favor yen at around ¥95." The currency markets were caught completely off guard by his comments and responded by selling the yen in a panic, driving it lower by more than half a yen vs. the dollar -ultimately to ¥93.77, its lowest level versus the dollar since last August.

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